Friday, July 6, 2012

Get the Shot not the Flu

Ako 'to... Mommy Ni Gabby at 6:32 PM


Our company annually hold the Get the shot not Flu campaign:  Free Flu vaccines for all of their employees. This benefit is extended to family and friends at a very friendly discounted rate :)
Last year, I bought additional vials for my Son, and My Lola. Both have been very strong against any type of colds, cough or fever for the past year. Especially mg Grandma who is quite old and can catch cold very easily. We've noticed how her body reacted to the vaccine. It was quite successful as within 1 year she only got colds ONCE. And it was not even that bad, compared to what she were getting the year before. So this year, I'm getting her another shot and so as the other members of the family as well, including my baby boy of course and my Mom :)

Here are some Flu vacs Facts to help you decide whether to get one or not. I'm telling you, it's really helpful. If you will pay the full price, it would cost around 1.2k to 1.5k. Depends on your doctor. but even at that amount, it's pretty much worth it, since it will definitely lowerdown the cost of your check-ups whenever you are sick. Simple consultation costs 400Php now. And you also have to buy meds, sometimes would cost 500php before you can even declare yourself Well.

Flu vaccine facts

  • There are two types of flu vaccines, the injection (with killed virus) and nasal spray vaccines (containing live, but weakened, virus).
  • Each year, the influenza virus can change slightly, making the vaccine used in previous years ineffective.
  • The vaccine is generally effective against the influenza virus within two weeks of administration.
  • The vaccine is only effective against the strains of the virus that match the vaccine.
  • The effectiveness of the flu vaccine is dependent upon the extent of the match between the virus strains used to prepare the vaccine and those viruses in actual circulation. The age and health status of the individual also play a role in determining the effectiveness of the vaccine.

Why vaccinate for the flu?

The flu is highly infectious and is a serious viral respiratory infection. Whereas with other viral respiratory infections the symptoms usually are mild and most people can continue working or going to school while ill, with the flu, the symptoms are severe and prolonged and cause individuals to miss days of work or school. The infection stresses the body. In addition, superinfections may occur. Superinfections are bacterial infections that occur on top of a respiratory infection. Bacterial respiratory infections also are a serious type of infection, and the simultaneous viral and bacterial infection can overwhelm the function of the lungs and the body. Among the elderly and the very young, it can cause death. Because of its infectiousness, morbidity (severity of symptoms and time lost from work or school), and the potential for death, it is important to prevent the flu by vaccination. Although there are medications to treat the flu, they are expensive, not as effective as vaccination, and need to be started within 24-48 hours of the start of symptoms.

What is the flu vaccine?

Flu vaccines are routinely available for seasonal influenza. Pandemic vaccines may also be developed for specific strains of the flu virus that are causing widespread disease, such as the H1N1 virus. Tested and approved, H1N1 vaccine first became available in October 2009 in the Americas.

There are two types of seasonal flu vaccines, the injection (with killed virus) and nasal spray vaccines (containing live but weakened virus). New for the 2011-2012 flu season is a vaccine that can be injected into the skin (intradermally) rather than into the muscle (intramuscular).

Each year, the influenza virus can change slightly, making the vaccine used in previous years ineffective. Each year, a new vaccine must be prepared that will be effective against the expected type of influenza virus. These are known as seasonal flu vaccines. The reason for the differences in circulating strains of the flu virus is that the virus can mutate, or change its structure, rapidly, leading to new subtypes of the virus. The key is to be able to predict which influenza viruses are going to cause infection and to prepare a vaccine against those viruses. Usually, scientists can predict accurately which types of influenza virus will cause infections and prepare an appropriate vaccine. The viruses that are used to prepare flu vaccine are grown in eggs.

The vaccine is generally effective against the influenza virus within two weeks of administration. The vaccine is only effective against the strains of the virus that match the vaccine. These strains vary from flu season to flu season each year. This is the reason that re vaccination is required annually with the vaccine that matches the strains of influenza that are currently prevalent.

Flu season can begin in October and last as late as May. October and November are considered the best times to receive the vaccination, but it is still effective when administered later.

Flu vaccination does not protect against infection caused by microbes other than the influenza virus.

How effective is the flu shot?

The effectiveness of the flu vaccine is dependent upon the extent of the match between the virus strains used to prepare the vaccine and those viruses in actual circulation. The age and health status of the individual also play a role in determining the effectiveness of the vaccine. Research has shown that when there is a good match between the virus strains chosen for the vaccine and those in circulation, the vaccine prevents influenza illness in approximately 70%-90% of healthy adults under 65 years of age.

A study of children from 1-15 years of age showed that inactivated influenza vaccine was 77%-91% effective in preventing influenza respiratory illness. The effectiveness of the vaccine in preventing respiratory illness in people over 65 years of age is somewhat lower. Among older people who reside in nursing homes, influenza vaccine is most effective in preventing severe illness, secondary complications, and deaths. The vaccine can be 50%-60% effective in preventing influenza-related hospitalization or pneumonia and 80% effective in preventing influenza-related death, although the effectiveness in preventing influenza respiratory illness can be as low as from 30%-40%.

-Source

0 comments:

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Got Somethin' to say? Pls shoot me an Email

 

JustWhatever! Copyright © 2011 Design by Ipietoon Blogger Template | Women's Secret